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🧊 The Plunge - December 6, 2023

Published 3 months ago • 2 min read

Clarity on staying healthy and happy arrives every day, from all corners of the globe. The Plunge brings you the information you always wanted: current, clear-cut answers from the world's leading scientists and creators.



The Digest

Content Hangovers

We worry about how we'll feel after a big night drinking or a super-sized Big Mac meal, but not the doom-scrolling that sneaks into our empty time. It's not just time now that's wasted that really grips us, but later, after we've had time to digest.

As always, we're continuing to test things out at The Plunge. If you have any thoughts, complaints, or feedback tap the "Reply" button and let me know.

YouTube


TECH

nue.life: Ketamine Therapy

nue.life provides Ketamine therapy for treatment resistant depression, often showing improvements within hours of the first dose. Their treatment provides deeper insights into the root causes of mental health issues. Ketamine is FDA approved and is already widely used in hospitals as an anesthetic. Clinical trials are beginning to support its effectiveness in treating depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

To increase accessibility, nue.life has developed in-home programs as a cost-effective alternative to IV infusions, supported by a companion app for seamless interaction with clinical teams. Clinician-led integration groups and health coaching sessions complement the therapy, pushing the company's conviction that healing must be collaborative.

The team has delivered 90,000+ treatments for depression, anxiety, and PTSD. For the 650 treatment resistant patients they've worked with, 60% saw clinically significant improvements after just six sessions. For many, this means rapid results in hours, rather than weeks.

nue.life


RESEARCH

Just Don't Sit

A study from UCL and the University of Sydney shows that just a few minutes of moderate exercise in place of sitting each day significantly improves heart health. This research, part of the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting and Sleep (ProPASS) consortium, is the first to explore the link between daily movement patterns and heart health.

The team's study analyzed 15,246 individuals from five countries, using wearable devices to track their activity. Moderate to vigorous physical activity, even for short periods, was found to greatly benefit heart health, more so than light activity or standing. Replacing just 30 minutes of sitting with exercise was shown to lead to measurable improvements in BMI, waist circumference, and glycated hemoglobin levels.

Sure, more vigorous activities provide quicker benefits, but lower-intensity activities can also be effective if sustained longer. Unsurprisingly, less active individuals gain the most from shifting to active behaviors. While the study doesn't establish a direct cause-and-effect between movement and cardiovascular health, it's another piece of evidence linking physical activity to improved heart health.

European Heart Journal, SciTechDaily

Naked Clams: The sustainable protein

Naked Clams, known as shipworms, may just be the next sustainable and nutritious seafood option. Unlike their traditional image, these little worms, which feature small shells and constantly burrow into wood, convert wood into protein and resemble the taste of oysters or mussels. The little "clams" grow extremely fast, reaching up to 1 foot in six months, making them a more efficient choice than oysters and mussels, which take about two years to harvest. A recent study shows the potential of industrially farming Naked Clams. They're already a delicacy in the Philippines and may very well open a new sector in sustainable food production. Naked Clams are rich in Vitamin B12 and capable of being fortified with omega-3 fatty acids through an algae-based feed. More than that, they are eco-friendly thanks to their easy farming conditions that allow them to feed on waste wood. The farms can even be set up in urban environments, positioning them as a potentially critical part of the diet of the future.

Nature


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The Plunge

by Corey Garvey

Hey I'm Corey, the curator of The Plunge, my newsletter focused on healthspan and longevity. The Plunge gives subscribers up to date articles, podcasts, and videos about longevity and remaining mentally fit while living a long, happy life. ~Corey

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