profile

The Plunge

🧊 The Plunge - November 15, 2023

Published 4 months ago • 3 min read

Clarity on staying healthy and happy arrives every day, from all corners of the globe. The Plunge brings you the information you always wanted: current, clear-cut answers from the world's leading scientists and creators.



TECH

eSight

Vision loss, a condition affecting millions of Americans, doesn't only impact the elderly. Although 12.2% of those aged 65-74 and 15.2% of individuals over 75 experience vision issues, nearly 3% of Americans under 18 also struggle with vision impairments. Groundbreaking technology, like eSight, offers hope. Launched in 2006 when R&D began, their technology uses a high-speed, high-definition camera to capture real-time images. The images are then optimized and displayed on OLED monitors inside the glasses, one for each eye. The brain synthesizes these images, allowing users to see with unprecedented clarity. For people with significant central vision loss, this can allow them to achieve 20/20 vision. The technology is a life-changer, just ask the blind man who was able to see for the first time in 38 years.

eSight


RESEARCH

Super Skin Cream

Northwestern University scientists have made a skincare breakthrough with a synthetic melanin in the form of a potent skin cream. The cream mimics natural human melanin, providing frontline defense against skin damage from sunlight and toxins. The cream acts as more than a shield, healing the skin by extending the immune system. Its power lies in its ability to scavenge free radicals, notorious for causing skin aging and cancer. 'Super melanin' is more efficient than its natural counterpart because it also acts as a protective sponge on the skin's surface, absorbing damaging agents. It also manages all of this without penetrating the skin, instead forming a protective layer, significantly speeding up healing in skin tissue.

Medical Xpress

Phones and Fertility

Researchers at the University of Geneva and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute recently published data showing a link between mobile phone usage and male fertility. 2,886 Swiss men aged 18 to 22 participated in the study in which frequent mobile phone users were shown to have a notable decrease in sperm concentration and total sperm count. No association was found between mobile phone use and sperm movement or shape.

The study spanned from 2005 to 2018, showing that men who use their phones more than 20 times a day have a 21% decrease in sperm concentration compared to those using them less than once a week. It's crucial because the chance of pregnancy is known to decrease with decreased concentration, and very low concentrations lead to increased time to conception.

These findings are just one more data point in a frightening trend in which sperm count in men has halved over the last fifty years. It's been assumed that environmental factors and lifestyle habits play a part, but this is the largest study of its kind to confirm the influence of mobile phones. Interestingly, the position of the phone doesn't seem to have an impact.

SciTech Daily


THE PLUNGE + AI

The Plunge + AI explores the use of AI in our healthspan journeys.

Short on time? Listen to The Plunge

Healthspan is about more than our bodies, we need to cultivate our minds to be happy over time. Let's see how AI can make it easier to avoid getting lost in the mania of overwhelming content.

Personally, I'm looking forward to having a Tony Stark-esque morning routine where a personal, digital assistant kickstarts my day. And what better way to start any day than The Plunge.

Using the VoiceOver plugin, I wanted last week's Plunge delivered via audio. It's not revolutionary, but the beauty lies in the simplicity. From here, it'll be just a few tweaks to build a morning playlist to start my day.

Enjoy listening to last week's Plunge, or try yourself for this week:

(I realize that some of the headers lead to funky transitions in the audio. I'll work on cleaning this up in future issues)


Visit gettheplunge.com to view all of this content and more. Get in touch if you have any suggestions, feedback, or thoughts.

Forward this email to whoever you know that needs cold, actionable insights in their inbox.


Received this email from a friend? Subscribe here.


113 Cherry St #92768, Seattle, WA 98104-2205
Unsubscribe · Preferences

The Plunge

by Corey Garvey

Hey I'm Corey, the curator of The Plunge, my newsletter focused on healthspan and longevity. The Plunge gives subscribers up to date articles, podcasts, and videos about longevity and remaining mentally fit while living a long, happy life. ~Corey

Read more from The Plunge

Clarity on staying healthy and happy arrives every day, from all corners of the globe. The Plunge brings you the information you always wanted: current, clear-cut answers from the world's leading scientists and creators. celisjuicebar​ BLOG What's there to worry about? Comparison is the thief of joy”. Like Adam Grant, writer and professor, I used to take this attitude to heart. Recently, he pointed out that it’s not comparing ourselves to others that sucks the beauty from life, but being...

about 2 months ago • 4 min read

Clarity on staying healthy and happy arrives every day, from all corners of the globe. The Plunge brings you the information you always wanted: current, clear-cut answers from the world's leading scientists and creators. labottegagardencity​ PODCAST GLP-1 Agonists - What to expect? Ben Thompson dug into GLP-1 Agonists on his Plain English podcast recently. In part one, he looked at the science behind the drugs and how they work on the body. Perhaps more interesting was the second part, where...

2 months ago • 3 min read

Clarity on staying healthy and happy arrives every day, from all corners of the globe. The Plunge brings you the information you always wanted: current, clear-cut answers from the world's leading scientists and creators. chatelainechocola​ TECH Listening to Our Bodies A new wearable device for continuously monitoring body sounds for health purposes has been developed by researchers at Northwestern University. The devices, published in Nature Medicine, are soft, miniaturized, and adhere to...

3 months ago • 3 min read
Share this post